Call for contributions for a ‘Book’ Proposal on The Uses of Transliteracy

I am compiling a 'book' proposal, working title The Uses of Transliteracy. The title and final  brief are yet to be decided, but I would like it to interrogate the ways in which transliteracy is being examined and applied across disciplines, countries and cultures.

In terms of format, it makes sense for it to be a multimedia product rather than a straightforward print or digital book, so suggestions for appropriate publishers would be very welcome.

At this time, if you'd be interested in contributing please submit some details via this short form. If you'd like to discuss your idea first, please email me. NB: UK academics please note that this volume will *not* be completed in time for the 2014 REF

Advertisements

Electronic Literature Collection, Vol. 2

ELC2main

The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 2, recently launched on the web, is an anthology of works by an international group of authors "that pushes through the boundaries of literary forms, creating new kinds of experiences for interacting readers." Published by the Electronic Literature Organisation, and edited by Laura Borràs, Talan Memmott, Rita Raley, and Brian Kim Stefans, Volume 2 picks up where the first volume, ELC1, left off.

The new collection includes 63 works drawn from (and extending beyond):

  • Countries: Austria, Australia, Catalonia, Canada, Colombia, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands, Portugal, Peru, Spain, UK, US
  • Languages: Catalan, Dutch, English, French, German, Portuguese, Spanish
  • Formats: Flash, Processing, Java, JavaScript, Inform, HTML, C++

Like ELC1, the collection can be browsed by author, title, or keyword. ELC2 speaks to both the continuity as well as the bright future of electronic literature. The works include many of the emerging categories of e-lit: mash-ups, geolocative, codework, as well as “traditional” and evolving forms such as hypertext, chatbots, and interactive fiction. The authors list presents readers with both veterans and newcomers to the field.

Contributors to this TRG blog, Kate Pullinger and Christine Wilks, are amongst the authors represented in the collection. ELC2 is also available on DVD for free on request from the ELO.

ELC2 is published under a Creative Commons license, which means the collection can be freely shared, non-commercially, between individuals, libraries, and schools, provided that appropriate attribution is maintained and the works are unmodified.

Electronic Literature Directory launches

Elo_logo

The Electronic Literature Directory is a resource for readers and writers of born-digital literature. Created by the Electronic Literature Organization, it provides an extensive database listing electronic works, their authors, and their publishers. The descriptive entries are drafted by a community of e-lit authors who also tag each work and identify the techniques used in its creation. Discussions of entries are ongoing and offer a networked, peer-to-peer model for literary review.

The new version of the Directory promises to be a great resource of e-literature, and already contains a substantial amount of work, but it's just the beginning, there is much more to add! Creating, reading and critiquing electronic literature is a transliterate practice – let's contribute! Anyone with an account can submit entries to the Directory (but authors may not write about their own works) and entries must be about e-literature (defined below) although e-lit antecedents, such as Raymond Queneau's 100,000,000,000,000 Poems, are included.

Electronic Literature refers to works with important literary aspects that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the stand-alone or networked computer.

See also the lively debate here: Electronic Literature Directory Gets a Redesign, in response to the question posed, "What do you think about electronic literature? Has it lived up to the hype?"

Dipping my toes in the water

Thank you, Sue, for welcoming us to the blog.

I'm looking forward to contributing some thoughts on my journey towards transliteracy, although not without some trepidation in the august presence of the other contributors. I've been online for the majority of most days in the past twelve years or so, but I'm a relative newbie when it comes to the in-depth exploration of the undulating and tangential web.

The MA in Creative Writing and New Media that I've just completed under the expert guidance of Sue Thomas and Kate Pullinger opened my eyes to art and content possibilities that I had not encountered before. Because I hadn't even known that they existed, I had never looked for them, despite my love affair with online search.

I suppose this is one of the most valuable things I took from the course: that the journey in the networked world is inevitably a communal one to at least some degree … to expand our knowledge and insight and to grow as 21st century people, we need not only our lovely machines and ever-cleverer software, but also other fellow travellers as companions and as guides. Otherwise, we are likely to follow only our own well-worn paths. These offer, of course, many joys and discoveries as sophisticated search tools enable us to mine the deepest seams in our areas of interest, but they may not challenge us to our full potential. 

For this reason, finishing my MA saddened me a little as it ended a time of sharing with the majority of the other students who have elected to do the course over two years and can look forward to another year of intense exchanges. So it was a relief to attend if:book's Fictional Stimulus launch event in London last Tuesday eve and realise that participation in the ongoing discovery and discussion of digital literature is still only a click away.

Splash! Splash! I'm in!