Talking #transliteracy with @dajbelshaw @PatParslow @hrheingold @daveowhite @ambrouk

First posted at my personal blog

Today, the looming start of term requires grant and report writing but I cannot settle to it without first referencing one of those complex Twitter conversations that suddenly burst out last night and needs to be addressed. This is where Twitter quickly becomes annoyingly much too constraining, but this post will also be short as time is limited today.

Last night @dajbelshaw @ambrouk @PatParslow @hrheingold @daveowhite and I were discussing a new post by @dajbelshaw on digital literacies, open source and Google, a conversation which led us in all kinds of directions including digital and analogue cultural normalization, crap detection, and the post-digital. This morning I followed up on suggested reading via 2 pieces by @daveowhite from 2009 – one on the post-digital and an earlier one on preparing for it

I'd like to make a quick comment on the notion of post-digital, or post- anything for that matter.  My research into transliteracy has convinced me that thinking linearly about literacy is seldom a good idea. Literacy should be thought of as a holistic ecology, not a linear series of events and changes. Yes, we can trace all kinds of 'first uses' to dates or moments in time but what is much more important than a first use is the way that a tool or skill becomes integrated and unified within the greater sphere of all literacies – nonverbal, visual, grammatical, alphabetical, interpersonal, cultural, interactional and so on. 

There are some who find transliteracy annoying because it is too much like a theory of everything. I appreciate their irritation, but point out that it was not until we developed the unifying concept of 'the environment' that real progress started to be made in terms of collaboration towards ecological sustainability. I predict that the same will be found to be true of literacy once we realise that theconnections between varieties of literacies are endlessly more fascinating and productive than the differences.

 

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Tropical Storm Irene and Social Media

Image from CBC News.

Recently Tropical Storm Irene has ripped it’s way through several areas causing massive destruction. It “began as a hurricane and was later reduced to a tropical storm and then downgraded again to a post-tropical cyclone, delivered enough rain to cause flooding in Lower Manhattan on Sunday.” Irene then moved on to Canada, leaving thousands without power in Quebec and the Atlantic Canada. During the raging storm, people kept abreast of news using Twitter and other social media tools. Some interesting examples include:

 

Twitter Reaction to Tropical Storm Irene: Relief by  on Mashable

The Live Time Square Webcam via EarthCam

Search Twitter for #Irene

A Crowdsourced Damage Map via Sarah Kessler on Versions.

 

 

Here’s a YouTube video by catdoodle documenting the storm in St. Andrews, New Brunswick. 

New Media Writing Prize 2011

New Media Writing Prize 2011

Bournemouth University’s Media School is delighted to announce the second annual prize for new media writing.

The prize encourages writers working with new media to showcase their skills, provoke discussion and raise awareness of new media writing, the future of the 'written' word and storytelling. The prize is split into two categories: student and professional. The winners in each category will receive a valuable bundle of new media hardware and software. The judging panel are looking for good storytelling (fiction or non-fiction) written specifically for delivery and reading/viewing on a PC or Mac, the web, or a hand-held device such as an iPad or mobile phone. It could be a short story, novel, documentary or poem using words, images, film or animation with audience interaction.

Anyone can apply! Whether you’re a student, a professional, an artist, a writer, a Flash designer or an enthusiast, the competition is open to all. It's an international competition, open to all outside the UK. The deadline is midday on Monday 31 October 2011 and each entry should be submitted by email to submissions@newmediawritingprize.co.uk. Shortlisted entrants will be invited to the awards ceremony on the 23 November where the winner will be announced. There will be substantial media coverage for the Awards, and winners will be given full acknowledgement in all press releases and related material.

For further information please visit the New Media Writing Prize website.

A high profile Awards Ceremony will be staged at Bournemouth University on Wednesday 23 November. An esteemed panel of judges will select winning entries that will be published on high profile new media web-hub, The Literary Platform, the Bournemouth University website and will be showcased at the Awards Ceremony.

Welcome to new contributors Souvik Mukherjee and Bobbi Newman

I'm delighted to announce that two new contributors have agreed to write for the Transliteracy Research Group. Souvik is writing from India, and Bobbi from the USA. I very much look forward to their perspectives. Meanwhile, here are their bios. Read about the whole team here.

Souvik Mukerhjee

Mukherjee Souvik Mukherjee is an independent research fellow working on digital game narratives. Besides his reearch on videogames, Souvik has also been involved in analysing the impact of social media projects on communities, especially in relation to transliteracy and business innovation., as a research fellow in the Film, Media and Journalism department of De Montfort University.  He completed his PhD on storytelling in New Media, especially  focusing on videogame narratives, and has published and presented papers on a range of related topics. Besides New Media, Souvik also takes a keen interest in e-learning and has been involved in analysing online media and virtual learning network usage in a higher. After completing his project at DMU, he has returned to India, where he hails from, to develop New Media research networks. Souvik writes about his research on his blog Ludus ex Machina and tweets as @prosperoscell

Bobbi Newman

Newman

Bobbi is dedicated to helping libraries find their place in the digital age. She is passionate about 21st century literacies and the role of all libraries in equal access and opportunity for all. Her professional interests include digital and technology based services, the digital divide, and improving existing services through expanding traditional methods, while creating innovative new practices. On the personal side, she is on a never-ending quest for the perfect pair of shoes. Bobbi was named a Mover and Shaker by Library Journal in 2011. Her professional involvements and accomplishments include founding and coordinating the semi-annual Library Day in the Life Project. She is a frequent caller on T is for Training and a contributing editor and advocate at Library Renewal. In 2010 she co-founded Transliteracy Interest Group, LITA, ALA and served as Chair from 2010-2011. Bobbi co-founded and writes for the Libraries and Transliteracy Project. She was recently appointed as the LITA representative on the ALA OITP Digital Literacy Task Force and serves as an ALA Councilor-at-Large and on the OITP Advisory Committee. She shares her passions by consulting and speaking at local, national, and international conferences. She writes at Librarian by Day and Libraries and Transliteracy and lives in the USA.