Transliteracy Equations

My French is very poor these days so I had to resort to Babelfish to translate this interesting post at Urfist Info
Urfist Info: Information media computer critical… literacies = transliteracy.

It would already be necessary to start with these three "literacies", which remains still too often separate: the computer, media and information literacy. In other words, data processing specialists (or rather teachers in data processing!), sociologists of the media and specialists in education to the media, and librarian-documentalists, trainers of the "control of information". In short, EATIC (education with the TIC) + EAM (education with the media) + EAI (education with information) = EACI (education with the informational culture), French alternative of the transliteracy…! (since one likes the initials in France, we do not deprive!). It will be necessary to return (more seriously!) on these questions.

I hope the post's author, Alexandre Serres, will excuse the clunky Babelfish translation. It was interesting to see how closely his equation matches the one I proposed in March 2007 in a post titled Media + Digital + More = Trans ?

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Transliteracy Workshop at the IOCT, DMU – 28 January 2008

At the Transliteracy Unconference in September 2007 the general consensus was that participants wanted a workshop day in which they could begin to make transliterate objects. The fact that no-one could actually describe what these might be like added an extra frisson to the idea. We have now set a date to try to explore this further.
The first Transliteracy Workshop will take place on Monday 28 January 2008, in the Institute of Creative Technologies at De Montfort University, Leicester. We will begin at 10.30am with coffee and registration and end at 4pm. Beyond that, the structure of the day will be planned by the participants. Lunch will be included and, weather permitting, perhaps an IOCT stroll.
There are a small number of spaces available so we are making them available to readers of this blog on a first-come, first-served basis. If you are interested in attending please email Bruce (bmason01 at dmu dot ac dot uk) or Sue (Sue dot Thomas at dmu dot ac dot uk) as soon as possible to reserve a place.
The question of the materials required to make transliterate objects is obviously an engaging one. Of course we will no doubt be using the digital, but we expect to work with other materialities too, so if you wish to come along we would like to know:
(a) what materials/equipment you will bring to contribute?
(b) what materials/equipment you would like us to try to source, bearing in mind we have a limited budget.
If you can't attend but are interested in sharing ideas please add some comments to this post and we'll see if we can find ways to add them into the day.

First Monday publishes first peer-reviewed article on transliteracy

FirstMonday.gifThe highly-respected journal First Monday has published an article by the PART team at De Montfort University. Transliteracy: crossing divides lays out our current thinking about the concept and invites response and comment. Notable as the first peer-reviewed article on the concept, it was written collectively by Sue Thomas, Chris Joseph, Jess Laccetti, Bruce Mason, Simon Mills, Simon Perril, and Kate Pullinger – a supreme effort of collaboration!
Abstract Transliteracy might provide a unifying perspective on what it means to be literate in the twenty-first century. It is not a new behavior but has only been identified as a working concept since the Internet generated new ways of thinking about human communication. This article defines transliteracy as "the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks" and opens the debate with examples from history, orality, philosophy, literature, and ethnography.

Transliteracy: Crossing Divides

Published in First Monday, Volume 12 Number 12 – 3 December 2007
First Monday Article. Transliteracy: Crossing Divides

Transliteracy might provide a unifying perspective on what it means to be literate in the twenty-first century. It is not a new behavior but has only been identified as a working concept since the Internet generated new ways of thinking about human communication. This article defines transliteracy as "the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks" and opens the debate with examples from history, orality, philosophy, literature, and ethnography.

Read the full paper here.

Knol – putting the author at the centre

Taken direct from: Official Google Blog: Encouraging people to contribute knowledge

The web contains an enormous amount of information, and Google has helped to make that information more easily accessible by providing pretty good search facilities. But not everything is written nor is everything well organized to make it easily discoverable. There are millions of people who possess useful knowledge that they would love to share, and there are billions of people who can benefit from it. We believe that many do not share that knowledge today simply because it is not easy enough to do that. The challenge posed to us by Larry, Sergey and Eric was to find a way to help people share their knowledge. This is our main goal.

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Twitter and Twittories

I've been giving Twitter another go, with a feed into my Facebook account and generally linking up with the lives of various friends and colleagues. It's hard work but fascinating, and led me this Techcrunch article about a project which uses Twitter to create collaborative fiction – Twittories.
twittories.jpg

pensionbook

pensionbook.jpg
Coincidentally, the day after my call for transliterate jokes, this turns up. It comes from http://straightfrommybrain.com/